What is a microservice?

Check out my new YouTube video about “What is a microservice?”. This is part 1 of 4 of the Microservices mini-course.

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Why you need serverless microservices, yesterday!

I have just published my FREE course: Why You Need Serverless Microservices, Yesterday“. Enroll for FREE!

WhyYouNeedServerlessMicroservices_960x520In this course I will walk you through the many benefits of creating serverless microservices instead of the traditional node / instance approach including the use of containers. There are more than enough things to worry about when you want to create a new cloud system or transform a legacy system to operate in the cloud.

From a business point of view, there are huge benefits in going serverless rather than instance based (including containers). A very large jump in business agility can be achieved through focusing on the problems and opportunities rather than the technical jungle of traditional computing solutions.

From a technical point of view, it is almost nirvana where you can eliminate many points of failures in the architecture.

Serverless Microservices Online Courses

Update 04/03/2019: I have completed the FREE course: “Why you need serverless microservices, yesterday!“. Enroll for FREE!
At the moment, I’m working on four online courses in the following order:

 

Why You Need Serverless Microservices, Yesterday, FREE Course

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In this course I will walk you through the many benefits of creating serverless microservices instead of the traditional node / instance approach including the use of containers. There are more than enough things to worry about when you want to create a new cloud system or transform a legacy system to operate in the cloud.

From a business point of view, there are huge benefits in going serverless rather than instance based (including containers). A very large jump in business agility can be achieved through focusing on the problems and opportunities rather than the technical jungle of traditional computing solutions.

From a technical point of view, it is almost nirvana where you can eliminate many points of failures in the architecture.

 

“How To Build An Event Store”, Paid Course

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Your event store is the heart of an event sourced system. The event store is the source of truth for all business events. It needs to be able capture and replay all domain events in your system reliably and with great performance.

In this course, I will walk you through building an event store that you can re-use in your own projects. In addition, I will walk you through building a read model that allows you to query domain events from the read model.

I will also go through why building your own event store has many more advantages over using a third-party event store.

We will be building the event store in AWS DynamoDB but you can apply the design to a traditional RDMS SQL storage just as well. I will go over the pros and cons in doing so.

 

“Architecting And Designing Event Based Microservices”, Paid Course

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Learn the details on how to design and architect event based microservices using Domain Driven Design (DDD), Event Storming, CQRS, and EventSourcing techniques. I will show you how best combine many principles, patterns, and techniques to create an architecture with as few points of failures as possible and still deliver a great solution.

What you will learn can be applied to cloud based systems but also to traditional, on-premise systems. The benefits are great in either environments.

Whether you are designing a new system in a greenfield environment or transforming a legacy system, I will show tips & tricks that you can use depending which type of project you are in.

 

“Implementing A Serverless Microservice in AWS”, Paid Course

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Learn the details on how to implement a serverless microservice in AWS using Domain Driven Design (DDD), CQRS, and EventSourcing techniques.

We will build a fully functioning billing system in AWS using Visual Studio and C# .NET Core. Even if you are not familiar with C# and .NET Core, you will learn a lot of practical tips on using the different AWS services including building fully automated CI/CD pipelines.

 

I’m still working on these courses but I’m planning on publishing “Why You Need Serverless Microservices, Yesterday” and “How To Build An Event Store” first.

Updated C# Reference Implementation

I have updated my C# reference implementation and included FluentValidation on some of the DTO objects. I also updated the ErrorMap to include validations on the server side as well as on the WPF client side. This version also includes a sample SQL Server Persistence Provider. As always, you can get the latest code on my GitHub repo.

Slides for Sacramento .NET User Group

Update 04-05-2015: I completed the SQL Server Provider. Latest code is on GitHub.

I had a lot of fun presenting last night at the Sacramento .NET user group. It was great to hear that people learned a lot and are looking forward in incorporating the things they have learned about the Provider Model design pattern and object persistence in general into their own projects. The slides are available for download here. The source code of the entire reference implementation is available here. I will be finishing up the SQL Server provider within the next few days and make it available in my GitHub repo.

Object Persistence Reference Implementation

I’ve been updating my reference implementation in the last few days. I’m actually using this reference implement in my own projects. You can download the latest version on my GitHub repo.

This is a complete .NET C# reference implementation to help you jump start a service oriented system running in a cloud environment such as Amazon’s EC2 or on-premis clusters.

This reference implementation shows you how to build a client and the server side. The client side is a sample WPF application that communicates via http REST requests using JSON payloads to the service side. Of course, you can use any type of client as long as the client can communicate via http and REST based JSON’s.

The service side is using a Web API 2 service layer that communicates to a central domain model. The service side demonstrates how to handle exceptions and edge cases and how to communicate failure to the client.

The persistence layer demonstrates the extreamly powerful provider pattern to store the domain objects into the following databases:

  1. db4o (an object database)
  2. Redis (a NoSQL database)
  3. SimpleDB (a NoSQL database)
  4. SQL Server (comming soon)

Please note that the entire system has no knowledge on how the objects are stored. All implementation details are in the individual providers listed above. This means that you can switch the persistence provider without having to recompile and therefore switch a running system from one persistence store to another.

I will try to create a sample SQL Server provider soon.

appsworld North America 2015 at Moscone Center West, San Francisco

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I’m a confirmed speaker at the appsworld North America 2015 at Moscone Center West, May 12-13 in San Francisco, CA.  Discover the future of multi-platform apps. See all confirmed speakers. This sure will be an exciting event. I’m still working on my presentation that will include Redis, Amazon AWS, C#, and more. I will see you there.